Thursday, December 31, 2015


Washington Island, Wisconsin -

We're down to counting the hours, now, some of us, to the end of the year 2015.

What's notable today?   For one thing, winter appears to have finally arrived, with a grand entrance of stormy weather.  First there were the high winds as Christmas Eve morning arrived.  This got everyone's attention.  Then, we entered back into a week of mild and calm air before the next one hit this past Monday afternoon, lasting well into the early morning of December 29.

Even higher winds than the Christmas Eve storm were sustained, over a good 12-hour period.  This most recent storm caused large windows facing the NE to flex during the highest gusts, and the winds were accompanied by moisture:  sleet, then snow.

My guess at snow levels, as I plowed and shoveled what had been clear pavement and green grass on Sunday, was a wind-drifted ten inches or so of snow.  Very hard to judge, and I guess the exact amount doesn't matter that much.   Other northeastern Wisconsin locations reported snowfall in excess of one foot.  This was a good start to getting snow cover before the temperatures drop even more.

Certain things happen when heavy snow and lower temperatures occur around open water.   Here, near the shallows at the end of Main Road, 'snow ice' began building southward during the storm, extending to the end of Snake Island.  This ice is still not safe enough to walk on, and and there are open pockets here and there.  It may not even stay, but break up, leave, and then refreeze, depending on winds and temperatures over the next few weeks.   But it's a start toward winter for those itching to ice fish, or travel over the ice by foot, skis or snowmobile, as winter gets its into its groove.

At the Island Ferry Dock, the gusting winds over open harbor waters blew spray across the piers and onto nearby objects, and it also made for slick walking.  The ferries moored in Detroit Harbor once again had their lines about to slide over the top of mooring posts.   The high water levels we're now experiencing, plus the deepened channel from dredging, allows for more sea action within the harbor near the docks.  This is one drawback apparent when there are such extremes in conditions as we experienced during in the last two storms.   Ice in the bay, and in the harbor, which we expect to see before too long, will serve to dampen such wave motion.

The photo below was taken by Paula Hedeen of Northport from her home Tuesday evening, and its a reminder of the contrasts that occur this time of year from one day to the next, with variations not only in weather, but also in the beauty of the landscape or seascape.

Ferry Washington returning home evening of December 29,
passing astern of cement carrier St. Mary's Challenger.

This blog marks the 299th that will be archived here on this website since 2010, for the benefit of those who have time on their hands and enjoy retracing steps and memories.  I should mention that, since updating my software, I seem to have lost the file and the touch for creating a Blog Notification Group.   Please consider becoming a follower, and I think then you'll have automatic notification of new postings.   Tell me if this does not work for you, and I will try something different.

Have a Happy New Year in 2016!

 - Dick Purinton

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